House Bill Would Enhance U.S. States’ Iran Sanctions Authority

On July 26, 2017, a bill was introduced in the House that would bolster U.S. states’ authority to impose sanctions on parties that engage in certain business with or in Iran. The State Sanctions Against Iranian Terrorism Act, H.R. 3425, would “amend the Comprehensive Iran Sanctions, Accountability, and Divestment Act of 2010 to secure the authority of State and local governments to adopt and enforce measures restricting investment in business enterprises in Iran, and for other purposes.” Among other measures, the House Bill would expand U.S. states’ authority to impose indirect Iran sanctions by excluding or debarring from state procurement and investments parties that do business in or with Iran, where… Read More

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Congressional Hearing: Managing Terrorism Financing Risk in Remittances and Money Transfers

Congressional Subcommittee to Hold Hearing on Terrorism Financing Risk in Remittances and Money Transfers  The U.S. House of Representatives Financial Services Committee (the “FSC“) Terrorism and Illicit Finance Subcommittee will on July 18, 2017 hold a hearing entitled “Managing Terrorism Financing Risk in Remittances and Money Transfers.”  The FSC memorandum to all of its members states that the “hearing will explore the terrorist and illicit financing risks that are inherent in any form of asset transfer whether through formal banking channels, MSBs, other legitimate remittance networks, or through informal and unregulated value-transfer systems.”  Concerns about the terrorism financing risks posed by non-bank facilitated money transfers have been constant since 9/11. The FSC’s memorandum describing… Read More

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State-Owned Enterprises and Anti-Corruption Enforcement

Anti-Corruption Enforcement and State-Owned Enterprises: Understand Unique Risks and Incentivize Compliance State-owned enterprises (SOEs, including sovereign wealth funds) are prominent players in international business. Given their ownership, SOEs have garnered scrutiny for their lack of transparency and heightened anti-corruption and anti-money laundering risk, as have individual SOE executives and other personnel who qualify as Politically Exposed Persons. In connection with commercial activities, SOEs are not protected in most cases by sovereign immunity. Thus, SOEs can, like their privately-owned counterparts, be subject to foreign legal processes. Given the greater scrutiny around SOEs and some of the high profile enforcement actions involving them directly or indirectly (for example, the 1MDB case), anti-corruption… Read More

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